'अर्थपूर्ण जीवनाचा समाजात शोध' घेण्यासाठी २००६ साली डॉ. अभय आणि डॉ. राणी बंग यांनी तरुणांसाठी विकसित केलेली शिक्षणप्रक्रिया म्हणजे 'निर्माण'...

समाजात सकारात्मक बदल घडवून आणण्यासाठी विविध समस्यांचे आव्हान स्वीकारणा-या व त्याद्वारे स्वत:च्या आयुष्याचा अर्थ शोधू इच्छिणा-या युवा प्रयोगवीरांचा हा समुदाय...

'मी व माझे' याच्या संकुचित सीमा ओलांडून,त्यापलीकडील वास्तवाला आपल्या कवेत घेण्यासाठी स्वत:च्या बुद्धीच्या,मनाच्या व कर्तृत्वाच्या कक्षा विस्तारणा-या निर्माणींच्या प्रयत्नांचे संकलन म्हणजे "सीमोल्लंघन"!

गेल्या तीन महिन्यातील निर्माणींच्या धडपडींचे थोडक्यात पण नेमके वृत्त आपल्यासाठी घेऊन येतील अमोल amolsd07[at]gmail[dot]com आणि सतीश गिरसावळे girsawale.sg[at]gmail[dot]com व सीमोल्लंघन टीम!

निर्माणबद्दल अधिक माहितीसाठी - http://nirman.mkcl.org; www.facebook.com/nirmanforyouth

Thursday, 27 October 2016

The Times They Are A-Changin’



            Half a century ago, Bob Dylan shocked the music world by plugging in an electric guitar and alienating folk purists. For decades he continued to confound expectations, selling millions of records with dense, enigmatic song-writing.  Now, this poet laureate of the rock era has been rewarded with the Nobel Prize in Literature this year, an honour that elevates him into the company of T. S. Eliot, Gabriel García Márquez, Toni Morrison and Samuel Beckett. At 75, he is the first musician to win the award, and his selection is perhaps the most radical choice in a history stretching back to 1901. In choosing a popular musician for the literary world’s highest honour, the Swedish Academy, which awards the prize, has dramatically redefined the boundaries of literature, setting off a debate about whether song lyrics have the same artistic value as poetry or novels.


           In this issue of Simollanghan, we acknowledge and applaud this ground-breaking history with one of Dylan’s own timeless songs, The Times They Are A-Changin’

            Dylan wrote the song in the September of 1963 as a deliberate attempt to create an “anthem of change”. According to him, it is “about the people who don’t take you seriously but, expect you to take him or her seriously.” From the youth’s point of view, this incorporates everyone from parents to teachers, from those who programme TV channels to politicians. And yet, what has been called one of the most famous protest songs of all times isn’t really protesting anything.  It is rather saying, “it’s time to wake up, the world has moved on”.  It is a song about perception.  You don’t have to arise up and overthrow the evil empire, but rather just admit that the world has changed irrevocably.  So be careful – it might just pass you by, and you might just be left wondering where the old world went.

   

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